Throwback Thursday – 1962

My father was one of the original Madmen and worked in advertising. On the weekends, he sometimes created art projects like transforming a baby buggy into a shoe.

Susie and Patty July 4th 1962

It was the 4th of July and my sister, Patty, and I were characters from, The Old Woman and the Shoe. I’m the old woman and she’s one of the children who lived in crampt shoe conditions. My mother was a fine seamstress and sewed our outfits. Patty is wearing a rosebud dress and I am in the hoop skirt. We gathered in front of Queen of Peace Church and paraded down the streets of our neighborhood.

It seems, I was directionally challenged from the start. Note the stroller next to us. It appears we’ve crashed.

Do you remember this abusive nursery rhyme?

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.

She had so many children, she didn’t know what to do;

She gave them some broth without any bread;

Then whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.

Fun times!

 

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About Susie Lindau

I am a Boulder, Colorado writer and artist who loves adventure both real and imagined. Come with me. It's always a Wild Ride!
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63 Responses to Throwback Thursday – 1962

  1. You guys were adorable and apparently your Dad was quite talented. That nursery rhyme, however, I’m not sure what to say. That is the first time I have ever heard it that way. I remember a line about “She went to the cupboard, The cupboard was bare” and I don’t remember the last line. Maybe I blocked it out.

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  2. Who needed video games and horror/slasher movies? – we all heard all those dark tales/rhymes as kids. Even Disney and cartoons. No one claimed those warped their personalities. Life lessons they were called (try and say that about the games and movies now HA HA juries and judges?)
    People didn’t take stuff so seriously then. Too much exaggerated concern, drama-for-show-and fortune, and fretting over small stuff now.

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  3. 4amWriter says:

    I don’t think I’d ever heard the last part of that rhyme. Can’t imagine why that wasn’t repeated often in school or at home!

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  4. Cayman Thorn says:

    Yanno . . of all the abusive elements of that nursery rhyme . . from living in a shoe with all those kids, to whipping them soundly before putting them to bed . . the part about feeding them broth without any bread? That is wrong on SO many levels. You need bread to sop up the broth! Come on!

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  5. pegoleg says:

    What a cool float! Your dad and mom sure were creative.

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  6. Omg I forgot about that rhyme. YIKES! There is a house shaped like a shoe near where I grew up that is now some kind of museum. I don’t know if I want to go in there!

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  7. PapaBear says:

    Who doesn’t remember that poem, Susie? I heard it a million times if I heard it once. Ah, so much different from the tales and stories being written today. We didn’t have to have all the total violence, blood and gore !!! Some of us even improved on the old ones, such as “humpty dumpty got smashed and fell off the wall… and all the kings horses and all the kings men got smashed one and all. :)

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    • susielindau says:

      Ha! I never heard that variation!
      You’re right about violence. Kids need a break from it somewhere! I bet Mother Goose is still on many shelves… :)
      Great to “see” you, Paul!

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  8. OMG. This took me right back to a memory of listening to a record of “This old lady” when I was a kid. “I know an old lady who swallowed a fly. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly, perhaps she’ll die”. Fun times indeed! And so cute :)

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    • susielindau says:

      That’s another one! Hahaha! My mother-in-law gave my kids the soft puppets which swallowed each other!
      There must have been a lot of exasperated parents who happened to be poets. :)

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  9. Wonderful, thanks for sharing. I find it touching what your parents did for their kids, especially making things.

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  10. I only recall the first part of that nursery rhyme, Susie. It’s likely that I was shielded from the rest of it. How barbaric! You seem far more tolerant about wearing a hoop skirt than I would have been. I would have pitched a fit that lasted until age 30.

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  11. What a precious picture, Susie. Wow. The costumes are amazing as it the shoe. LOL on crashing it onto another buggy. What’s up with all the nursery rhymes – they all have a dark and twisted message.

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  12. Susie, so fortunate you were, to have such talented parents. They must have been very devoted to you and your siblings. Lovely memories. :-)

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    • susielindau says:

      I am fortunate and they are still with us in their 80’s! My dad draws every afternoon, but my mom has glaucoma. She had to give up sewing, but cooks and bakes every day! Thank you! :)

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  13. What cutie patuties!
    Diana xo

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  14. Well 2 A+’s for your parents for a clever idea and clever costumes. C- for the driving instructor.

    Thanks for sharing. I love cute “old” pictures.

    Patricia Rickrode
    w/a Jansen Schmidt

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  15. Catherine says:

    That is so very lovely :)

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  16. Some of those nursery rhymes and fairytales were abusive and scary and creepy! Love the capture :) Happy Thursday

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  17. marcymckay says:

    Your father sounds like quite a card. Now I know where you get it. My father was 6’3″ and weighed 300 pounds. In 1965, he was the sole survivor of a private plan crash (sadly, the other 2 men were killed). His size saved him, but the crash crushed his spine and he was 6’2″ after that.

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  18. joehoover says:

    it’s a wonder we spelt at night with nursery rhymes.
    Jack be Nimble suffered third degree burns
    Humpty Dumpty smashed himself in falling off the wall, Jack and Jill did something similar, and were probably on life support.
    Hush Little Baby has plenty of terrible events but it’s unclear if the baby is present in them.
    And Little Miss Muffet had to contend with the most hideous spider

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  19. I think most of them are quite dark Susie.

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  20. claywatkins says:

    It’s interesting to read the words of nursery rhymes – they are non-sensical babble at times and then some are profound wisdom – you just never know. Great photo from way back when! Happy throwback Thursday!

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  21. I could see CPS at the door of the shoe now. This was great.

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  22. Times were sure different, as we can see from the old nursery rhymes.

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    • susielindau says:

      So true! I don’t think we really gave it much thought when we were kids. :)

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      • That’s right! We didn’t get all tied in a knot over Little Black Sambo and think we were being racist, We loved him! We didn’t get bent out of shape over calling Indians redskins. We were whiteskins. So what? When we played cowboys and Indians in the backyard, we always wanted to be the Indians. And I didn’t think that all step-mothers were bad or lose sleep over the witch being burned in the oven in Hansel and Gretel. It was one bad woman and the witch deserved her fate. I didn’t have nightmares. But the vampire and horror shows of today are so bad that as an adult I can’t watch them without getting nightmares.

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        • I remember the first time I heard about the kids in that poem getting whipped soundly. I was three years old and didn’t know exactly what was wrong with it, but it bothered me a little. My mom just smiled like it was a cute little poem. It wasn’t child abuse back then, I guess, though Dr. Spock had already written, “Baby and Child Care” and we boomers were gradually becoming the dictators of acceptable words, thoughts and behaviors to our parents.

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